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SPCA recommending charges after 'extremely starved' dog found in crate

The B.C. SPCA said Luffy, a two-year-old pitbull terrier, was "severely emaciated" when surrendered into the charity's care. (B.C. SPCA) The B.C. SPCA said Luffy, a two-year-old pitbull terrier, was "severely emaciated" when surrendered into the charity's care. (B.C. SPCA)
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The B.C. SPCA is preparing to recommend charges after finding an "extremely emaciated" dog confined to a crate in a dark basement, according to the charity’s North Cariboo shelter.

An animal protection officer discovered Luffy, a two-year-old pitbull terrier, after responding to a complaint about the animal's health and living conditions, the SPCA said in a news release Thursday.

Kristen Sumner, manager of the SPCA's North Cariboo animal centre, said Luffy was taken for emergency veterinary attention "immediately" after the dog was surrendered into the charity's care.

"Luffy was so extremely starved, he could only be given food or water under a veterinarian’s care because of the risk to his brain and other organs," Sumner said in a statement.

The dog was kept at an emergency clinic for four days, receiving IV fluids and being fed a "nutrient-dense paste" via syringe, according to the SPCA. Luffy was also treated for internal parasites.

The animal has since gained back some weight, but the process has been slow, Sumner said.

"Due to the scarcity of food in the home where he was living, we are also working with him on his resource guarding and to build his trust and confidence that there will always be food for him," she added.

"We have been keeping his routine very consistent and he is finally relaxed enough to enjoy his comfy big bed instead of constantly worrying about getting another meal."

The B.C. SPCA said Luffy will be placed up for adoption once he has reached a healthy weight and been neutered.

The case remains under investigation but the SPCA said it is expecting to recommend charges. 

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