Skip to main content

Amanda Todd case: Teen’s family share victim impact statements at sentencing hearing

Share

Warning: Disturbing content

Ten years after her daughter died by suicide at age 15, Amanda Todd’s mother Carol delivered a victim impact statement at the sentencing hearing for a Dutch man convicted of extorting and harassing the teen.

The Crown is seeking a 12-year prison sentence for Aydin Coban. In August, a jury found Coban guilty of extortion, harassment, child luring, possession of child pornography, and possession of child pornography for the purpose of distribution. He was not charged in relation to Todd’s death.

With a framed photo of Todd by her side, Amanda’s mother told the court she wished she could hold her one more time, or have one more conversation with her.

“Amanda was once a vibrant child, and a curious young person,” Carol said, and added her daughter wanted to make a difference. “It is her voice we must continue to hear.”

She also read a statement from Todd’s older brother, who said he would miss being an uncle to her children and growing old together.

Todd’s father Norm also addressed the court, and said he was consumed with grief after his daughter’s death.

“My daughter deserved to have a happy, carefree childhood,” he said. “Her tormentor filled her waking moments with fear, humiliation, anxiety, despair, and a desperation that should never be part of a young girl’s life.”

CROWN SAYS PERPETRATOR 'UNREPENTANT' 

Before her death in October 2012, Todd shared a video online which showed her holding up handwritten cards describing blackmail and bullying. That video was played in the courtroom following the victim impact statements, with silent images of Todd filling the screens. Her final message reads: “I have nobody. I need someone.”

At the start of Coban’s sentencing hearing at New Westminster Supreme Court on Tuesday, prosecutor Louise Kenworthy said the prison term they are requesting would be served consecutively to a sentence from the Netherlands he is currently serving. Before his extradition to Canada in 2020, a Dutch court sentenced Coban to almost 11 years in prison for online fraud and blackmail involving dozens of young girls and gay men.

“It’s the Crown’s submission that the evidence before the courts demonstrates that Mr. Coban is unrepentant,” Kenworthy said. ”He has been in custody for many similar offences since January 2014, and has shown no interest in rehabilitation.”

Kenworthy said the Extradition Act provides that by default, a Canadian jail sentence for a person who has been temporarily surrendered is to be served consecutively to a term of imprisonment imposed elsewhere. However, she added the court may also order the Canadian sentence to be served concurrently with the foreign sentence.

During the trial, the court heard how Todd was tormented for years by various online accounts, asking her to perform sexual acts on web-cam, and threatening to share explicit images of her if she didn’t comply.

“The offences he committed were morally repugnant. His conduct was calculated, callous, and had devastating consequences,” Kenworthy said. “It’s the Crown’s submission that Mr. Coban is at high risk to reoffend, and needs to be separated from society for a lengthy period of time to protect children.”

Kenworthy said over a period of more than two years, Coban sent over 700 messages on four different platforms, and about a third were sent to Todd. The rest were sent to her family, friends, and others.

The sentencing hearing is scheduled for four days.

CTVNews.ca Top Stories

opinion

opinion 5 reasons not to invest in mutual funds

Traditionally, mutual funds have stood as a go-to investment strategy for those looking to grow their wealth without the effort of stock-picking. But financial columnist Christopher Liew outlines some reasons why mutual funds often aren’t the golden ticket they're made out to be, especially in Canada.

Stay Connected