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1 arrested for public intoxication near Rogers Arena during Canucks' 1st playoff game

Rogers Arena is seen on March 24, 2024. (Shutterstock) Rogers Arena is seen on March 24, 2024. (Shutterstock)
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While most festivities celebrating the Vancouver Canucks' playoff return were "safe and festive" outside Rogers Arena, police say one person was arrested for causing a disturbance.

It's been nine years since the Canucks played a playoff game in the city and fans crowded parts of the downtown core Sunday evening to watch the team's first game against the Nashville Predators. By the end of the game, fans had something to celebrate as the Canucks beat the Predators in an exciting 4-2 comeback. 

"Thousands of people packed the streets around Rogers Arena last night, and many more watched the game from bars and restaurants throughout the city," Sgt. Steve Addison of the Vancouver Police Department said in a news release. "We’re proud of all the fans who celebrated responsibly and helped make Game 1 a positive experience."

Police said they increased patrols around Rogers Arena ahead of the game, and while the atmosphere was mostly positive, one person was arrested for public intoxication. The VPD said its officers responded to "several incidents," adding some people created an "unsafe environment for other fans."

"Excess consumption of liquor often leads to disorder, fights, and other violence that impacts everyone’s safety and ability to enjoy the festivities," Addison said. "We remind everyone to consume your liquor at home or in a licensed establishment, but not on your walk to the game."

The VPD said it will continue to deploy extra officers on game nights throughout the playoffs.

Vancouver Canucks take on the Predators for Game 2 on Tuesday at 7 p.m. 

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