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Scholarship launched for volleyball player killed in B.C. car crash, two critically injured athletes identified online

The three Thompson Rivers University volleyball players involved in a tragic car crash in Kamloops last week are seen in photos from the TRU Wolfpack website. (Left to right: Owen Waterhouse, Owyn McInnis, Riley Brinnen) The three Thompson Rivers University volleyball players involved in a tragic car crash in Kamloops last week are seen in photos from the TRU Wolfpack website. (Left to right: Owen Waterhouse, Owyn McInnis, Riley Brinnen)
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A scholarship has been set up in memory of the varsity volleyball player killed in a multi-vehicle crash in Kamloops, B.C., last week.

The tragic collision near Thompson Rivers University involved six cars and sent seven people to hospital, three of them members of the men’s volleyball team at the school. One of the young athletes died in hospital and two were left with life-altering injuries.

Owyn McInnis, an outside hitter originally from Guelph, Ont., has been identified as the student killed. He was 22.

“Owyn was a son, brother, fiancé, teammate and so much more,” reads a post on TRU Wolfpack’s website. “He brightened the day of anyone lucky enough to talk with him and we miss him greatly.”

The university said a $20,000 contribution from two anonymous donors will fund the Owyn McInnis Memorial Men’s Volleyball Athletic Award to keep his legacy alive.

An online fundraiser was also set up Tuesday for McInnis’ family to cover funeral costs.

“From the day he was born, Owyn brought immense joy and warmth into our lives. As a varsity athlete, he showcased not only exceptional skill but also unwavering dedication to his craft,” the GoFundMe description reads.

The catastrophic crash happened around 3 p.m. on Nov. 29 at the intersection of McGill Road and University Drive, when a Dodge Ram truck hit “several small trees” before striking a Volkswagen—containing the three volleyball players—that was stopped at a red light, according to Mounties. The collision resulted in secondary crashes with four other vehicles.

A memorial for TRU Wolfpack volleyball player Owyn McInnis was set up at the scene of the crash. (Image credit: Kristen Holliday/Castanet)

The two critically injured athletes—both from Kelowna—have been identified through online fundraisers.

A GoFundMe for Owen Waterhouse created Monday states he remains in a medically induced coma in a Kamloops hospital ICU and has sustained severe brain trauma.

“More than just an outside hitter and an exemplary teammate for the TRU Wolfpack Men's volleyball team, Owen is an extraordinary young man who lights up any room he enters with his smile,” reads the fundraiser’s description. “His love for his family, friends, all animals and every imaginable sport, is known to all.”

The fundraiser for the Waterhouse family has raised over $110,000 as of Tuesday afternoon.

Psychology student Riley Brinnen was taken by air ambulance to Vancouver General Hospital after the crash with a severe spinal injury, according to the GoFundMe set up for him on Saturday. The organizer, his sister, writes he underwent surgery last Thursday and is currently in the spinal ICU, and that it’s expected he’ll stay at the GF Strong Rehabilitation Centre for several months.

“Riley is a strong, athletic, absolute sweetheart of a man,” the description reads. “We love you Riley and are here for the long haul.”

Brinnen’s fundraiser has garnered more than $93,000 in donations as of Tuesday afternoon.

Police are urging anyone with dash cam video or information about the crash to call the Kamloops RCMP detachment at 250-828-3000.

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