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Highway reports: Sea to Sky could get up to 50 cm of snow, Environment Canada warns

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While most of Metro Vancouver is expected to see rain rather than snow Wednesday, a winter storm warning is in place for the Sea to Sky highway between Squamish and Whistler.

Environment Canada's alert for the route says as much as 30 to 50 centimetres of snow is expected to accumulate.

So far, about 20 to 30 centimetres has fallen in the area, the warning says, but up to 15 more centimetres are expected throughout the day. While snow may briefly change to rain, another five to 10 centimetres are predicted later this evening before the "robust frontal system" moves out of the region.

"Surfaces such as highways, roads, walkways and parking lots may become difficult to navigate due to accumulating snow," Environment Canada's warning says. "Rapidly accumulating snow will make travel difficult. Poor weather conditions may contribute to transportation delays."

Meanwhile, alerts remain in place for multiple highways in B.C.'s Interior. Warnings have been in place since late last week for Coquihalla Highway between Hope and Merritt, the Trans-Canada Highway between Eagle and Rogers passes, and for Highway 3 between Paulson Summit and Kootenay Pass.

A winter storm warning was in effect for those routes as of Wednesday morning, with heavy snow, gusty winds and reduced visibility expected.

"A strong Pacific frontal system is pushing through the B.C. Interior. Snowfall associated with the system will continue into Thursday. In addition, gusty southwest winds will develop today and persist into Thursday," Environment Canada's notice says. "Snowfall amounts will vary along the routes due to elevation but totals of 25 to 40 cm can be expected."

For Kootenay Pass, however, the accumulating snowfall may continue through Thursday evening, the warning says.

Drivers hoping to travel along one of those routes are urged to consider postponing non-essential trips. 

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