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Here's what Vancouverites are leaving behind in Ubers

The Uber app is seen on an iPhone near a driver's vehicle after the company launched service, in Vancouver, Friday, Jan. 24, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck The Uber app is seen on an iPhone near a driver's vehicle after the company launched service, in Vancouver, Friday, Jan. 24, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
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What do you think Vancouverites are leaving behind when they hitch a ride?

Rideshare giant Uber released its annual “Lost and Found Index” Wednesday, providing a glimpse into the backseats of hired cars across Canada.

As it turns out, Vancouver is the fifth “most forgetful” city in Canada, an improvement from last year when it was ranked third. The city where the most items are left in Ubers is Montreal, followed by Saskatoon and Winnipeg.

The days when people forgot their things in the car the most often were unsurprisingly Halloween weekend and New Year's Day.

The most commonly forgotten item in Vancouver is clothing, followed by backpacks and other kinds of bags. Headphones, jewelry, umbrellas, wallets, e-cigarettes, phones, laptops and watches round out the rest of the list.

But more unconventional belongings have been lost in Ubers over the course of the year too. In Vancouver, someone left a fishing rod behind in their ride.

Other “unique” forgotten items included a deep fryer in Edmonton, a Santa costume in Calgary, amethyst crystals in Ottawa, and a Segway, gold dentures and someone’s girlfriend’s designer heels in Toronto.

Uber says that people who leave an item behind can contact their driver through the app—and on a computer if it’s your phone you lost—and coordinate a time and place to meet up. Uber charges a $20 fee to have a lost item returned, which it says goes entirely to the driver because they have to return the item themselves.

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