Skip to main content

Indigenous land defender sentenced to jail time over Trans Mountain pipeline protest

William George, a member of the Tsleil-Waututh First Nation and a guardian at the watch house near the Trans Mountain pipeline's Burnaby facility, pauses while speaking during a news conference with Indigenous leaders and politicians opposed to the expansion in Vancouver, B.C., on Monday, April 16, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck William George, a member of the Tsleil-Waututh First Nation and a guardian at the watch house near the Trans Mountain pipeline's Burnaby facility, pauses while speaking during a news conference with Indigenous leaders and politicians opposed to the expansion in Vancouver, B.C., on Monday, April 16, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Share

An Indigenous man will serve time behind bars in British Columbia for his actions in protest of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion.

Will George, a member of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation described by the term "land defender" for his activism to protect the environment, was sentenced to 28 days in jail Tuesday.

The sentence followed a breach of an injunction issued by the B.C. Supreme Court ordering those named in the order from physically obstructing or impeding access to a Trans Mountain terminal in Burnaby.

In a statement outlining the decision made at George's sentencing hearing, a group calling itself Protect the Planet, Stop TMX said George(REMOVED COMMA) is the first member of the Tsleil-Waututh nation to be convicted for resisting the pipeline "while on his own ancestral, unceded land."

The group said George, who was tried in the fall, was the only one charged despite several people having been at the site that day.

They said Supreme Court Justice Shelley Fitzpatrick sided with the Crown when determining her sentence. The group is critical of the court for opting against a sentence of community service and probation.

CTVNews.ca Top Stories

These Picassos prompted a gender war at an Australian gallery. Now the curator says she painted them

They were billed as artworks by Pablo Picasso, paintings so valuable that an Australian art museum’s decision to display them in an exhibition restricted to women visitors provoked a gender discrimination lawsuit. The paintings again prompted international headlines when the gallery re-hung them in a women’s restroom to sidestep a legal ruling that said men could not be barred from viewing them.

Ben Affleck and Jennifer Lopez publicly list their house for sale

Ben Affleck and Jennifer Lopez have added a tiny bit of fuel to the fire surrounding their marriage. Amid speculation that the pair are struggling in their relationship after marrying about two years ago, the couple has listed their 12-bedroom, 24-bathroom California home for sale.

Stay Connected